Restless hearts

Every year – when I was a pastor to youth in the Bay Area in California – I took a large group of young people to a small village in Mexico. We would camp right in the center of town next to the church. Besides conducting a week long vacation Bible school for the children and nightly worship services, over the years, we built a new church and a public play ground in the park.

When I think back over those years, and reminisce about what we accomplished for the Kingdom of God, I believe the greatest impact took place in the hearts and minds of each American teenager, as they encountered a dichotomy. They were experiencing the happiest people they had ever met, who possessed nothing of material value. These folks were dirt poor, yet they were genuinely happy, and their lives were full of purpose and meaning.

Gallup did a survey of 132 countries and found those with lower per capita economic output actually had higher rankings for meaning and happiness, as well as lower suicide rates. It turns out that those countries are more religious, giving people a sense of purpose.

Over 1600 years ago Augustine said, “You have made us for yourself, O God, and our hearts are restless until they find their rest in you.”

Despite that reality, today, increasing numbers of Americans, are looking away from God and the church, seeking to construct their own meaning. Yet those self-made answers rarely quiet our restless hearts. As Pascal said, “It is in vain, oh men, that you seek within yourselves the cure for all your miseries. All your insight has led to the knowledge that it is not in yourselves that you discover the true and the good.”

The Christian worldview, based on biblical revelation, answers all of life’s big questions, explaining both our human dignity and our depravity. The Bible also directs us to a fixed reference point by which we can orient our lives: God Himself. “Man’s chief end,” the Westminster Shorter Catechism states, “is to glorify God and to enjoy Him forever.”

This much is for certain, our hearts certainly won’t find rest in money.

“Now there is great gain in godliness with contentment, for we brought nothing into the world, and we cannot take anything out of the world. But if we have food and clothing, with these we will be content.” 1 Timothy 6:6-8